Info

Tasmanian Devil Saviour Greg Woods

Associate Professor Greg Woods, an immunologist from the University of Tasmania's Menzies Research Institute and the Save the Tasmanian Devil Program pictured at enclosure containing some of the quarantined insurance populations of Tasmanian Devils. In the wild, tasmanian devils have become endangered due to a contagious cancer which causes facial tumours, causing the animals to starve to death. In December 2009, Woods announced that he and other researchers had found that the disease may be related a peripheral nerve cell, called the Schwann cell, which has led some hopes for preserving the devil, at least in terms of quarantine insurance populations.

Add to Cart Add to Lightbox Download
Filename
_MG_7918-tasmanian_devils_greg_woods20091126.jpg
Copyright
2009 Dave Walsh
Image Size
4397x3074 / 4.6MB
Contained in galleries
Tasmanian Devil Facial Tumour Disease, Tasmanian Devils Full Collection
Associate Professor Greg Woods, an immunologist from the University of Tasmania's Menzies Research Institute and the Save the Tasmanian Devil Program pictured at enclosure containing some of the quarantined insurance populations of Tasmanian Devils. In the wild, tasmanian devils have become endangered due to a contagious cancer which causes facial tumours, causing the animals to starve to death. In December 2009, Woods announced that he and other researchers had found  that the disease may be related a peripheral nerve cell, called the Schwann cell, which has led some hopes for preserving the devil, at least in terms of quarantine insurance populations.